Arts&Crafts_Exterior

Match the Curb Appeal to the Home’s Style

Does your listing’s curb appeal match it’s architecture? A new guide provides tips on how to achieve curb appeal that compliments a home’s architecture.

The Fypon Style Guide, created with Duket Architects Planners in Toledo, Ohio, provides tips on adding polyurethane products that match a home’s architecture in adding to its curb appeal.

“This free guide makes it easy for home owners, builders, and remodelers to add stylish architecturally accurate accent pieces to home exteriors,” says JJ Rogers, sales operations manager with Fypon. “These are lightweight, easy-to-install products that are designed to complement different styles of homes and eliminate people shuddering as they drive by a home.”

See the differences among some of the home styles featured in the guide:

Classic (including Georgian, Federal and Victorian styles): Earmarked by a strong symmetry and design elements that remain timeless, Classic style homes have impressive curb appeal because of their well-balanced front elevations. Exteriors are highlighted by columns, shutters, door surrounds and crossheads. Adding curb appeal: Classic rails and newel posts with trim collars, rail blocks, and baluster panels can enhance these house exteriors.

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Photo credit: Fypon Style Guide

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Photo credit: Fypon Style Guide

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Photo credit: Fypon Style Guide

Arts & Crafts: Popularly referred to as Arts & Crafts, Mission ,or Prairie style homes, these simplistic house designs feature booth woodgrain and smooth textures on the exterior. Adding curb appeal: Fypon’s solid woodgrain closed-ended beam with a rafter end and a woodgrain bracket enhance the porch, which is commonly included on these home styles. A square top and bottom rail combined with a rail support block can help create a porch system when matched with square balusters. Dentil blocks, a timber trellis and fishscale panels also can help curb appeal on an Arts & Crafts exterior.

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Photo credit: Fypon Style Guide

Mediterranean: Often associated with the 1920s and 1930s, Mediterranean style homes can be found in Spanish, Greek, and Italianate home designs. Known for having stucco walls and low-pitched roofs, Mediterranean style homes feature layouts inspired by lush gardens, courtyards, pools, and fountains. Adding curb appeal: Tile vents, corbels for under the roofline, woodgrain plank shutters, columns, and decorative accents for doorways.

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Photo credit: Fypon Style Guide

Country/Cottage: Including Farmhouse and Cape Cod styles, these simplistic homes — often with sprawling porches — offer comfort and efficiency. Adding curb appeal: For farmhouse style homes with simple trim details, try louvered shutters, porch posts, louvers, and symmetrical brackets. Flat trim, crossheads and plain porch posts complete the farmhouse style. For a Cape Cod style home, try newel posts in straight and corner panel styles that can be coupled with a classic square baluster system. This straight-forward home design looks best when enhanced with crossheads over first-floor windows and dormer kits used to trim out second floor dormer windows.

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Photo credit: Fypon Style Guide

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Photo credit: Fypon Style Guide

Today’s Traditional: Rooted in historical styles, Today’s Traditional homes mix style with practicality, and Old World touches with updated charm. Asymmetric entry doors and windows can be topped with crossheads to add instant curb appeal. Straight columns with minimal details at the base and cap flank the entryway, while small porches featuring square balustrade systems allow a place to relax. Adding curb appeal: Raised panel shutters and eyebrow louvers enhance the exterior of Today’s Traditional homes that often sport window boxes of colorful flowers to complete the home’s overall curb appeal.

Traditional_Exterior

Photo credit: Fypon Style Guide

 

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This post was contributed exclusively for REALTOR® Magazine.

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